As many of you readers know, I work as a geographer for a government agency which means that I have been furloughed this week.  Although Congress cannot get their act together, I figured it was a great opportunity for me to get my act together after a busy month of travel and finish up the exterior of my house.  So yesterday several furloughed friends and I spent the afternoon finishing up the siding on my dormers and roof. Although we couldn’t do our jobs to protect the environment as we do most days, it was great to do some physical labor and see the results of our work immediately.

Furloughed feds working on the Pera house

Furloughed feds working on the Pera house

EPA employees are quite skilled at carpentry too!

EPA employees are quite skilled at carpentry too!

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Last of the dormer siding!

Last of the dormer siding!

For those of you who have kept up with my posts over the past year, you’ll know that this siding project has been the longest and most labor intensive siding project in the history of tiny houses (okay, I don’t know that for sure, but I’m pretty certain!)  It’s been a very emotional process – especially upon discovering things I’d done wrong, wish I would have done differently, or things I had to do and then redo.  In the end, though, it challenged me to learn new skills  – planing, sawing, drilling, organization, project management, with which I still very much struggle!  In addition, I gained confidence in building (I hop onto my roof now to work where a year ago I was too scared to even climb the ladder to get up there!). Another positive outcome of it being a laborious process was that it allowed me to host numerous work parties with friends and volunteers, and I have such fond memories of all the folks who contributed to the siding, yesterday’s siding party being the last one!  Yes, we finally knocked off the remaining siding on the dormers and roof yesterday, and I’ve ended up with a pretty amazing-looking design.

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I have such gratitude for everyone who has helped with the siding of the house, whether that be a weekend of planing wood, an afternoon of treating boards, multiple work parties screwing them in, or spring afternoons helping me on my roof.  And then there were the numerous weekends I worked by myself – slowly, tediously, but meditatively, challenging myself to complete something I thought I would never finish.  There were many days I cursed the night we came up with this design, yet now that’s it’s finally done I think I’ll put on the rose-colored glasses and just remember the many weekends working on the house with friends and feel proud that we actually finished the most labor-intensive task on my house (well, let’s hope that no other task will take me almost a year to complete!)  Thanks, all!  Next up…insulation and interior!

Category:
Lee, The Houses

Join the conversation! 6 Comments

  1. Yay!!! Congratulations! I am so proud of you! What a talented daughter I have. I can hardly wait to see it in November and help a bit on the inside.

    Reply
  2. Howdy from sunny North Carolina! I have been following your blog. Your home is so cute. What is the rain screen idea for the exterior? Will you be posting interior photos as your building continues?

    Reply
  3. I too am also a federal employee. Unfortunately in Detroit, but I would love to be there and help out. I have been dying to get my own tiny house which would of come in crazy handy now. But my issue here is where to put it. My friends are less than enthusiastic to have a couple “sqwating” on their property. Good luck with the build and it all looks great

    Reply
    • Grant, I am not familiar with the tiny house community in Detroit, but there are lots of alternative creative types there, you just need to dig a little. Also, Detroit has no shortage of very very cheap empty lots, you just would need to find what to put in the front yard…

      Reply
  4. Congrats!! It looks great Lee. Wish I could see it in person.

    Reply
  5. […] Lee for finally finishing the Pera Houses‘s difficult siding project and for getting started on the […]

    Reply

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