Ten months ago I started a project to try to reimagine the tiny house on wheels– to add livability, streamline construction, modernize aesthetics, increase off-grid versatility, all while keeping costs affordable.  After 10 months of research, design work with Foundry Architects, structural review, panel manufacturing, and materials delivery, David Bamford (Element Design+Build) and I recently started construction at Boneyard Studios.

So the past few weeks we’ve been working hard to build this little structure, which I’m calling Minim House – fuller details (and eventually, plans) on the new Minim Homes website.  So far completed are the insulated floor and the walls.  The flooring is built on 2 long beams attached to the trailer, so the entire house can be detached and lifted off, should a permanent siting ever be wanted.  We’re also using SIPs panels (structural insulated panels) to speed construction, add much higher levels of insulation (R-24 walls and R-40 roof), and further reduce weight compared to stick built construction.  Since the SIPs arrived, it’s basically taken 3 full days to put up the walls, and will take another 2-3 full days to put up the ridge beam and add the roof panels.  While the SIPs panels require a little more work than anticipated, once the floor is in, 5-6 days to have a perfectly insulated, framed tiny house isn’t too bad.

Rather than have multiple build posts, I’ll add more updates and pictures here as construction moves forward. (click on pictures for captions)

Category:
Brian, Design, The Houses
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Join the conversation! 10 Comments

  1. Thanks. I’m Really interested in these things especially in these times we’re living in. Thanks again and looking forward to more in the future.

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    Reply
  2. Looks great! Am anxious to hear how you like the SIPs panels pro and con.

    Reply
  3. Dig the pics of the SIPS installation! Can’t wait to see it when I get back.

    Reply
  4. I would love to hear more about attaching your house to your trailer so it can easily be removed in the future. I am just getting started building 10′ x 20′ with a pop out for the bed. I am using a reclaimed RV trailer and have been thinking about attaching the house so I could remove it from the trailer in the future…but so far, all I have done is think about it. I am not sure how I would manage it.
    thanks for your post.

    Reply
    • Conceptually it’s easy- essentially we built the house on two skids that attach lengthwise with heavy bolts to the trailer bed. But in practice I recommend consulting with a structural engineer, as heavy upward loads would be placed on the floor joists if it is ever detached from the trailer.

      Reply
  5. [...] to work very well. The houses are the Minim House by Minim Tiny Homes/Boneyard Studios (link 1, link 2), and the Tiny SIP House by Art Cormier, based on the Tumbleweed Walden [...]

    Reply
  6. I like this design and I am curious to know more on how the SIPs worked. I do have a couple of questions. 1) How is the wheel well area insulated? It appears to be simply a void which would create two large areas for heat loss. 2) How is the structure removed from the trailer with the wheel wells interfering with it sliding off on the skids you mentioned? I assume you would need a crane to lift it off.

    Thanks for sharing your progress and look forward to the final product!

    Cheers
    DS

    Reply
    • Good questions- there actually is a bit of room for insulation over the wheels, just didn’t take a picture of it installed. And more insulation will go over at least one of the wheels on the interior of the house (there’s a sofa over the wheelwell so we’ll add more foam). As far as detaching, it could be fairly easily jacked up, blocked, trailer removed, then set down…

      Reply
  7. [...] to work very well. The houses are the Minim House by Minim Tiny Homes/Boneyard Studios (link 1, link 2), and the Tiny SIP House by Art Cormier, based on the Tumbleweed Walden [...]

    Reply

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